Second World War Articles from 2012

Updates from: 20142013201220112010200920082007

Articles from 2012

29 November 2012

On day two we add Helicopters, Observation and Liaison aircraft, Reconnaissance Aircraft, Trainers and Utility Aircraft.

28 November 2012

Today we start a series of articles on the aircraft designations of the USAAC, USAAF and USAF by looking at Fighter Designations, Bomber Designations, Glider Designations, Cargo Aircraft Designations and Attack Aircraft Designations.

27 November 2012

The 401st Bombardment Group was a B-17 Flying Fortress group that fought with the Eighth Air Force from November 1943 until the end of the war in Europe.

The 452nd Bombardment Group was a B-17 group that fought with the Eighth Air Force from February 1944 until the end of the Second World War.

22 November 2012

The 384th Bombardment Group was a B-17 Flying Fortress group that fought with the Eighth Air Force from June 1943 until the end of the war in Europe.

The 390th Bombardment Group was a B-17 Flying Fortress group that entered service just in time to take part in the raid on Regensburg on 17 August 1943 and that served with the Eighth Air Force for the rest of the Second World War

13 November 2012

The 2nd Bombardment Group was a B-17 bomber group that operated with the Twelfth and Fifteenth Air Force, taking part in the invasion of Sicily, the campaign in Italy and the strategic bombing campaign across Europe.

The 42nd Bombardment Group was a B-25 Mitchell group of the Thirteenth Air Force that operated in the Solomons, New Guinea, Borneo, the Philippines, off the coast of China and over French Indochina.

5 November 2012

The 20th Bombardment Wing was a B-24 Liberator Wing of the Eighth Air Force which took part in the strategic bombing campaign from December 1943 until April 1945.

The 93rd Bombardment Wing was a heavy bomber wing within the Eighth Unit that entered combat just before D-Day and supported the Allied invasion before taking part in the strategic bombing campaign for the rest of the war.

30 October 2012

The 92nd Bombardment Wing went through two incarnations during the Second World War, both as heavy bomber wings of the Eighth Air Force.

The 94th Bombardment Wing was a B-17 wing within the Eighth Air Force and took part in the strategic bombing campaign in Europe from December 1943 until April 1945.

24 October 2012

The 40th Bombardment Wing formed part of the 1st Air Division of the Eighth Air Force and took part in the strategic bombing campaign over Europe from September 1943 until the end of the Second World War.

The 41st Bombardment Wing was a heavy bomber wing within the Eighth Air Force, and operated three B-17 groups as part of the strategic bombing force from September 1943 until the end of the Second World War.

18 October 2012

The 100th Bombardment Group was a B-17 group that took part in the Eighth Air Force's strategic bombing campaign, supporting the armies on the continent after D-Day and was awarded the Croix de Guerre with Palms.

The 447th Bombardment Group was a B-17 group of the Eighth Air Force that took part in the campaign to support the D-Day landings before joining the full strategic bombing campaign.

17 October 2012

The 95th Bombardment Group was a B-17 group that took part in the Eighth Air Force's strategic bombing campaign over Europe as well as supporting the Allied armies fighting in Europe after D-Day.

The 96th Bombardment Group was a B-17 group that took part in the Eighth Air Force's strategic bombing campaign over Europe and also supported the Allied armies fighting on the continent after D-Day.

10 October 2012

The 385th Bombardment Group was a B-17 group of the Eighth Air Force and took part in the strategic bombing campaign over Europe.

The 388th Bombardment Group was a B-17 unit that took part in the strategic bombing campaign over Europe, as well as flying a number of tactical missions to support the Allied armies fighting in Europe after D-Day.

4 October 2012

The 2nd Bombardment Wing was a heavy bombardment unit of the Eighth Air Force, and its B-24 Liberators took part in the strategic bombing campaign in Europe, supported the fighting after D-Day and were briefly detached to the Mediterranean.

The 4th Bombardment Wing was a B-17 wing within the Eighth Air Force, and controlled a third of the bomber force until the formation of Bombardment Divisions. It took part in the strategic bombing campaign and also performed tactical bombing missions in support of the D-Day landings and the campaign that followed.

1 October 2012

The 94th Bombardment Group was a B-17 unit that took part in the US Strategic campaign over Germany from 1943 to the end of the war in Europe as well as directly supporting the D-Day landings and the land campaign in Europe.

The 381st Bombardment Group was a B-17 group in the Eighth Air Force and took part in the daylight strategic bombing campaign over Europe.

27 September 2012

No.453 Squadron, RAAF, went through two incarnations during the Second World War, first as a short-lived fighter squadron swept up in the Japanese invasions of Malaya, Sumatra and Java, and second as a fighter squadron based in Britain.

No.454 Squadron, RAAF, was a medium bomber squadron that flew maritime patrols in the Eastern Mediterranean in 1943-44 before joining the Desert Air Force in Italy where it acted as a ground attack unit for the rest of the war.

24 September 2012

The 351st Bombardment Group was part of the second wave of B-17 groups to join the Eighth Air Force, and took part in the daylight strategic bombing campaign over Germany.

The 379th Bombardment Group was part of the second wave of B-17 Groups to join the Eighth Air Force and took part in the daylight strategic bombing campaign over Germany.

18 September 2012

The 305th Bombardment Group was a B-17 Flying Fortress group of the Eighth Air Force and took part in the daylight strategic bombing campaign over Europe.

The 306th Bombardment Group was an early B-17 group within the Eighth Air Force and took part in the daylight strategic bombing offensive from its early stages in 1942 until the end of the war in Europe.

6 September 2012

The 1st Bombardment Wing formed part of the US Eighth Air Force's strategic bomber force and took part in the daylight bombing campaign over Germany and occupied Europe from 1942 until the end of the Second World War.

The 91st Bombardment Group was a heavy bomber group equipped with the B-17 and that formed part of the Eighth Air Force's strategic bomber force from November 1942 until the end of the Second War World.

29 August 2012

No.33 Squadron (RAAF) was a transport squadron that served in the south-west Pacific from 1942 until the end of the Second World War.

No.87 Squadron, RAAF, was a photographic reconnaissance squadron that operated over the Dutch East Indies, Timor, Java, Borneo and even the Philippines.

No.94 Squadron, RAAF, was a Mosquito fighter-bomber squadron formed in Australian in May 1945 but that never saw action.

23 August 2012

No.4 Squadron, RAAF, was an army cooperation squadron that used Commonwealth Wirraway and Boomerang aircraft in support of the troops fighting on New Guinea and Borneo.

No.5 Squadron, RAAF, was an army cooperation squadron that served on Bougainville, New Britain and New Guinea from late in 1944 until the end of the Second World War.

No.24 (City of Adelaide) Squadron, RAAF, took part in the defence of Rabaul in 1941-42, where it suffered heavy losses of aircraft. After escaping to Australia the reinforced squadron took part in the fighting on New Guinea. It was then reformed as a heavy bomber squadron in Australia and taking part in the campaigns on New Guinea, in the Dutch East Indies and on Borneo.

17 August 2012

No.450 Squadron, RAAF, was a fighter squadron during the fighting in Syria in 1941 and in North Africa before becoming a fighter-bomber squadron for the campaigns in Sicily and Italy.

No.451 Squadron, RAAF, was a fighter squadron that provided air cover over Syria, Cyprus and the Nile Delta in 1942-43, and took part in the invasion of Southern France before moving to the UK where it spent 1945 flying a mix of bomber-escort and fighter-bomber missions.

No.452 Squadron, RAAF, was formed in the United Kingdom where it served as a fighter squadron during 1941 and the first part of 1942. It then moved to Australia to face the Japanese, before taking part in the re-conquest of the Dutch East Indies and Borneo.

14 August 2012

No.1 Squadron (RAAF) first saw action during the Second World War as a Lockheed Hudson squadron that was destroyed during the fighting in Malaya, Sumatra and Java. It was then reformed in Australia, and attacked Japanese targets first from Northern Austrian and then from Borneo.

No.2 Squadron (RAAF) fought against the Japanese from 1941 until the end of the war, taking part in the desperate fighting on Timor in late 1941 and early 1942. It then took part in the defence of northern Australia, before going onto the offensive and carrying out a mix of reconnaissance missions and attack missions across the Dutch East Indies

No.3 Squadron (RAAF) was originally a reconnaissance unit, but in 1941 it became a fighter squadron and served in that role in North Africa, Sicily and Italy, ending the war as a ground attack unit.

9 August 2012

No.9 Squadron (RAAF) was responsible for the amphibious aircraft carried on the cruisers of the Royal Australian Navy. It was formed in January 1939 and was equipped with the Walrus.

No.10 Squadron, RAAF, flew with RAF Coastal Command for the entire duration of the Second World War, sinking six U-boats during that period.

No.15 Squadron, RAAF, was a Beaufort squadron that served as an anti-submarine and convoy escort unit from its formation in 1944 as well as sending a detachment to support the fighting on New Guinea.

19 July 2012

No.100 Squadron, RAAF, was the first Australian squadron to be equipped with Australian built Beaufort torpedo bombers, and fought in the defence of Australia and during the Allied campaigns on New Guinea.

No.102 Squadron, RAAF, was formed as a heavy bomber squadron but the war ended before it entered combat, and it saw limited use as a transport unit.

No.107 Squadron, RAAF, was an anti-submarine warfare squadron that used the Vought-Sikorsky Kingfisher to fly anti-submarine patrols off the east coast of Australia.

27 June 2012

No.692 (Fellowship of the Bellows) Squadron was part of the light night striking force of Bomber Command and was the first Mosquito squadron to use 4,000lb bombs operationally.

No.695 Squadron was an anti-aircraft co-operation squadron that was based in East Anglia from its formation in 1943 until being disbanded in 1949.

No.1435 Squadron was formed as a defensive fighter squadron on Malta, before becoming a fighter-bomber squadron operating over Italy and the Balkans.

25 June 2012

The USS Massachusetts BB59 was a South Dakota class battleship that first saw combat during Operation Torch late in 1942 before spending the rest of the Second World War serving in the Pacific.

The USS Alabama BB60 was a South Dakota class battleship that entered service with the British Home Fleet in 1943 but that spent most of the war operating in the Pacific, where she provided cover for the fast carriers and performed some shore bombardments.

22 June 2012

No.683 Squadron was a photographic reconnaissance that operated from Malta during 1943 before moving to Italy, where it spent the rest of the war.

No.684 Squadron was a photographic reconnaissance squadron that carried out long range missions over South-East Asia.

No.691 Squadron was an anti-aircraft co-operation squadron that served in the south-west of England from its formation late in 1943 until it was disbanded in 1949.

20 June 2012

No.680 Squadron was a photographic reconnaissance squadron that served in the Eastern Mediterranean and the Balkans from its formation in 1943 until early in 1945 when it was withdrawn to Egypt for mapping duties.

No.681 Squadron was a photographic reconnaissance squadron operating in the Far East that mainly focused on Burma but that also ranged further afield.

No.682 Squadron was a photographic reconnaissance unit that operated in the western and central Mediterranean during 1943 before moving to Italy where it remained for the rest of the war.

19 June 2012

USS South Dakota BB57 was the name ship of the second South Dakota class of battleships and served in the Pacific late in 1942, with the British Home Fleet during 1943 and in the Pacific again from 1944-45, serving as Admiral Nimitz's flagship during the surrender ceremonies in Tokyo Bay.

The USS Indiana BB58 was a South Dakota class battleship that spent her entire active career in the Pacific, serving from late in 1942 until the end of the war.

15 June 2012

The USS Washington BB56 was a North Carolina class battleship that became the only one of the ten fast battleships in the US Navy to sink a Japanese capital ship.

The second South Dakota class battleships were built to produce a ship with the same characteristics as the previous North Carolina class, but with armour that was effective against 16in guns.

14 June 2012

No.671 Squadron was an airborne operations squadron formed in South East Asia late in 1944 but that was never used in combat.

No.672 Squadron was an airborne operations squadron formed in South East Asia late in 1944 but that was never used in combat.

No.673 Squadron was an airborne operations squadron formed in South East Asia late in 1944 but that was never used in combat.

No.679 Squadron was an anti-aircraft co-operation squadron that served in East Anglia from 1943 until 1945.

13 June 2012

The two North Carolina class battleships were the first new American battleships to be built after the 'building holiday' agreed in the Washington Naval Treaty.

The USS North Carolina BB55 was the name ship of the North Carolina class of battleships and served in the Pacific taking part in many of the island invasions of 1943-45 as well as the battle of the Philippine Sea and the bombardments of Japan.

11 June 2012

No.667 Squadron performed target towing and gun-laying duties from Gosport. The squadron was formed on 1 December 1943 from Nos.1631 and 1662 Flights, and was initially equipped with the Boulton-Paul Defiant.

No.668 Squadron was an airborne operations squadron formed in South East Asia late in 1944 but that was never used in combat.

No.669 Squadron was an airborne operations squadron formed in South East Asia late in 1944 but that was never used in combat.

No.670 Squadron was an airborne operations squadron formed in South East Asia late in 1944 but that was never used in combat.

1 June 2012

Admiral Soemu Toyoda (1885-1957) was the commander-in-chief of the Japanese Combined Fleet during the crushing defeats in the battles of the Philippine Sea and Leyte Gulf (both 1944), where his desire for a 'decisive battle' played a part in both defeats.

Jessie Oldendorf (1887-1972) was an American admiral best known as the victor at the battle of the Surigao Strait (25 October 1944), the last naval battle to be fought between two forces of battleships.

31 May 2012

No.661 Squadron was an Air Observation Post squadron that served in north-western Europe from August 1944 until the end of the Second World War.

No.662 Squadron was an Air Observation Post squadron that served in north-western Europe from June 1944 until the end of the Second World War.

No.663 Squadron was a Polish-manned Air Observation Post that supported the Polish Army Corps during the last phase of the war in Italy.

No.664 Squadron was a Canadian manned Air Observation Post squadron that supported the First Canadian Army during the last few weeks of the fighting in north-western Europe in 1945.

No.665 Squadron was a Canadian manned Air Observation Post squadron that supported the First Canadian Army during the last few weeks of the fighting in north-western Europe in 1945.

No.666 Squadron was a third Canadian-manned Air Observation Post squadron but it was formed too late to see action and didn't reach the continent until after the German surrender.

28 May 2012

Rear Admiral Clifton 'Ziggy' Sprague was an American carrier admiral most famous for his role in the battle of Samar, part of the wider battle of Leyte Gulf, where his group of six escort carriers managed to avoid destruction at the hands of the main Japanese battle fleet, preventing the Japanese from reaching the vulnerable invasion shipping in Leyte Gulf.

Admiral Thomas Sprague (1894-1972) was an American carrier admiral who had overall command of the escort carriers engaged in the battle of Leyte Gulf, although his namesake Clifton 'Ziggy' Sprague played the more famous role in the battle.

18 May 2012

The P 40 Heavy Tank was the only heavy tank to be produced in Italy during the Second World War and would have been the best tank to be used by the Italian Army if more than one had been completed before the Italian armistice of September 1943.

The P 43 Heavy Tank (or P 30/43) was a design for a heavy tank based on the Italian P 40, but armed with a 90mm gun in place of the 75mm gun used on the P 40.

17 May 2012

The Semovente da 105/25 was the best Italian armoured vehicle of the Second World War, but it was only just entering service at the time of the Italian armistice.

The Carro Armato Celere Sahariano (Quick Tank for the Sahara) was an Italian copy of the British Crusader cruiser tank that reached the prototype stage.

15 May 2012

No.656 Squadron was an Air Observation Post squadron that served on the Burma Front.

No.657 Squadron was an Air Observation Post squadron that served in Italy from August 1943 until the spring 1945 before being transferred to the Netherlands for the last few weeks of the war in Europe.

No.658 Squadron was an Air Observation Post squadron that served in Normandy and northern Europe before moving to India after the end of the war.

No.659 Squadron was an Air Observation Post squadron that landing in Normandy soon after D-Day and that supported the Allied armies until the end of the war in Europe.

No.660 Squadron was an Air Observation Post squadron that supported the Second Army in north-western Europe from July 1944 until the end of the Second World War.

14 May 2012

Admiral Thomas Kinkaid (1888-1972) was an American admiral who commanded the 7th Fleet, cooperating with MacArthur during the liberation of the Philippines and who played a major part in the American victory at Leyte Gulf in October 1944.

Admiral Marc Mitscher (1887-1947) was an American admiral best known as the command of the fast carrier task force in the Pacific during the battles of the Philippine Sea, Leyte Gulf, Iwo Jima and Okinawa.

11 May 2012

No.651 Squadron was the first of fifteen Air Observation Post squadrons formed to provide light aircraft for artillery officers who would observe and correct the accuracy of their own guns.

No.652 Squadron was an Air Observation Post that landed in Normandy on the day after D-Day and supported the Second Army in Europe for the rest of the war.

No.653 Squadron was an Air Observation Post that landed in Normandy towards the end of June 1944 and that supported army in Europe for the rest of the war.

No.654 Squadron was an Air Observation Post squadron that supported the First Army in North Africa and the Eighth Army in Sicily and Italy.

No.655 Squadron was an Air Observation Post squadron that served in Italy from the summer of 1943 until the end of the Second World War.

10 May 2012

The Semovente da 75/34 was the second main entry in the series of self-propelled guns based on the M-13/ M-14/ M-15 series of Italian tanks and differed from the Semovente da 75/18 mainly by having a longer L/34 gun.

The Semovente da 75/46 was a self-propelled gun that was produced in tiny numbers by Ansaldo at Genoa during 1944.

The Semoventi da 90/53 was a self-propelled gun designed to form part of the divisional artillery regiments in the Italy army.

8 May 2012

Admiral Takeo Kurita (1889-1977) was a senior Japanese admiral who took was present at Midway, the fighting around Guadalcanal and the Battle of the Philippine Sea, but who is best remembered for his failure to take advantage of a potentially good position during the battle of Leyte Gulf.

Admiral Jisaburo Ozawa (1886-1966) was a Japanese admiral who took part in the early successes in Malaya, Sumatra and Java but who is best known for suffering a crushing defeat at the battle of the Philippine Sea and commanding a decoy carrier group at Leyte Gulf.

7 May 2012

The battle of the Surigao Straits (25 October 1944) was the last clash between battleships and saw a force of older American battleships crush a Japanese squadron attempting to break into Leyte Gulf.

The battle of Samar (25 October 1944) was the nearest the Japanese came to success during the battle of Leyte Gulf and saw a powerful Japanese battleship force come close to destroying a force of American escort carriers.

4 May 2012

No.628 Squadron was formed as a special duties squadron but spent most of its brief existence flying a mix of meteorological flights and air-sea rescue missions in the Bay of Bengal and the Indian Ocean.

No.630 Squadron was part of Bomber Command and took part in the strategic bombing campaign from its formation late in 1943 until the end of the Second World War.

No.631 Squadron was a target-towing and gun laying training squadron that was based in Wales from its formation 1943 until the end of the Second World War.

No.635 Squadron was formed as part of the pathfinder force of Bomber Command and carried out that role from its formation in March 1944 until the end of the Second World War.

No.639 Squadron was an anti-aircraft co-operation squadron that served in Cornwall from its formation in December 1943 until being disbanded in April 1945.

No.650 Squadron was a target-towing and gun-laying practice squadron that served on the eastern side of the Irish Sea from its formation in December until the end of the Second World War.

3 May 2012

The battle of the Sibuyan Sea (23-24 October 1944) was the opening phase of the battle of Leyte Gulf and saw American submarines and carrier aircraft attack Admiral Kurita's I Striking Force, sinking the massive battleship Musashi.

The battle of Cape Engano (25 October 1944) was a one-sided American victory that saw Admiral Halsey's 3rd Fleet sink four Japanese aircraft carriers, but at the same time exposing the invasion shipping in Leyte Gulf to a possible Japanese attack.

1 May 2012

No.623 Squadron was a short-lived heavy bomber squadron that took part in Bomber Command's strategic bombing offensive for three months.

No.625 Squadron was part of Bomber Command's main force from its formation in October 1943 until the end of the Second World War.

No.626 Squadron was a heavy bomber squadron that formed part of Bomber Command's main force from its formation in November 1943 until the end of the war.

No.627 Squadron was formed on 12 November 1943 as a Mosquito squadron within No.8 Group, where it served with the Night Light Striking Force.

30 April 2012

The Semovente da 75/18 was the first in a series of Italian self-propelled guns to be based on the chassis of the M 13/ M 14 and M 15 Medium Tanks, and mounted a more powerful gun than the medium tank it was based on.

The Semovente da 75/32 was a self-propelled gun that was produced in small numbers before being abandoned in favour of the more powerful Semovente de 75/34.

27 April 2012

USS Maryland (BB 46) was a Colorado class battleship that suffered only minor damage at Pearl Harbor and was in service for almost the entire Pacific War, taking part in the invasions of the Gilbert Islands, Marshall Islands, Marianas Islands, the Palaus, the Philippines and Okinawa.

USS Washington (BB 47) was a member of the Colorado Class of battleships, but work on her was abandoned after the Washington Naval Treaty was signed and she was instead used as a gunnery target.

USS West Virginia (BB 48) was a Colorado Class battleship that was the most seriously damaged of the ships sunk at Pearl Harbor to return to combat duties, taking part in the last year of the war in the Pacific.

26 April 2012

The battle off Formosa (12-16 October 1944) was an air battle between Japanese naval aircraft based on Formosa and the aircraft of the US 3rd Fleet that ended with an overwhelming American victory that crippled Japanese naval air power just days before the battle of Leyte Gulf (23-26 October 1944).

The battle of Leyte Gulf (22-26 October 1944) was one of the largest and most complex naval battles in history and ended as a massive American victory that effectively destroying the fighting capability of the Japanese navy.

25 April 2012

The M 15-42 was the final Italian medium tank of the Second World War, but was only just entering service at the Italian Armistice in September 1943.

The Semovente da 47/32 was a self-propelled light tank destroyer based on the chassis of the L 6-40 light tank.

20 April 2012

The Colorado class battleships were the last class of 'old' battleships completed for the US Navy, and were a repeat of the previous Tennessee class but with twin 16in gun turrets replacing the triple 14in turrets of the older ships.

USS Colorado (BB 45) was the name ship of the Colorado class of battleships, the last US battleships built before the Washington Naval Treaty of 1922. She was undergoing a refit when the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor and thus escaped damage. She took part in the invasions of Tarawa, the Marshall Islands, Saipan, Guam and Tinian, the landings at Leyte Gulf and the invasion of Okinawa

19 April 2012

The Tennessee class battleships were modified versions of the earlier New Mexico class ships, with an improved system of anti-torpedo protection and turbo-electric engines.

USS Tennessee (BB 43) was the name-ship of the Tennessee class of battleships. She survived Pearl Harbor with only minor damage and was present at many of the battles during the American advance across the Pacific towards Japan, from the Aleutians to Okinawa.

USS California (BB 44) was the second Tennessee class battleship and despite being sunk at Pearl Harbor was repaired in time to take part in the last year of fighting in the Pacific.

18 April 2012

The M 13-40 Medium Tank was the most important Italian tank of the Second World War, and due to the slow development of better medium tanks and the P 40 Heavy Tank had to bear the brunt of the fighting in North Africa despite being under-gunned and under-armoured by 1941-42.

The M 14-41 Medium Tank was an improved version of the M 13-40, with a more powerful engine and better desert equipment.

17 April 2012

The L 6-40 Light Tank was the first Italian light tank to be equipped with a fully traversing turret.

The M 11-39 Medium Tank was the first in a series of medium tanks that provided the main equipment of the Italian Armoured Divisions during the Second World War, but the M 11 itself was outdated by 1940 and most were lost in the first British offensive in the Western Desert.

13 April 2012

No.617 Squadron is undoubtedly the most famous RAF squadron of the Second World War, earning that fame on its very first operational sortie, the famous dams raid of 16/17 May 1943. The 'dambusters' went on to become a highly accurate precision bombing squadron, reserved for special targets – either small scale, difficult to hit or that required the use of Barnes Wallis's other special bombs of the Second World War, the Tallboy and Grand Slam.

No.618 Squadron was formed to use a scaled down version of Barnes Wallis' 'bouncing bomb' as an anti-shipping weapon, but despite a great deal of effort and a transfer to the Far East the squadron never carried out an attack with its new weapon.

No.619 Squadron was a heavy bomber squadron that formed part of Bomber Command's main force from 1943 until the end of the Second World War.

12 April 2012

The L 3-35 Light Tank was an improved version of the earlier L 3-33, with better armour and an improved engine.

The L 3-38 Light Tank was the last entry in the series of Italian light tanks that had started with the CV.29 and that played a part in Italian military successes of the 1930s.

6 April 2012

No.613 (City of Manchester) Squadron had a very varied wartime career, beginning as an army cooperation squadron and flying coastal patrols, air-sea rescue missions, tactical reconnaissance and fighter-bomber missions before ending the war as a night intruder squadron.

No.615 (County of Surrey) Squadron was a fighter squadron that took part in the Battle of Britain and the early sweeps over France before moving to Burma, where it performed a mix of offensive and defensive duties for the rest of the war.

No.616 (South Yorkshire) Squadron was a fighter squadron that became the first operational squadron to use a jet aircraft when it was equipped with the Gloster Meteor during 1944.

4 April 2012

No.610 (County of Chester) Squadron was a fighter squadron that took part in the Battle of Britain, before taking part in fighter sweeps,  shipping reconnaissance duties and the anti flying-bomb campaign

No.611 (West Lancashire) Squadron was a fighter squadron that flew a mix of offensive and defensive missions, ending the war as an escort squadron.

No.612 (County of Aberdeen) Squadron served with Coastal Command throughout the Second World War, spending most of the war operating from the UK but for the first half of 1942 it was based on Iceland.

2 April 2012

No.607 (County of Durham) Squadron was a fighter squadron that took part in the fighting in France in May 1940 and the Battle of Britain before moving to the Far East where it operated over Burma from 1942 until the end of the war.

No.608 (North Riding) Squadron went through two incarnations during the Second World War, the first with Coastal Command and the second as the only Auxiliary Air Force squadron to join Bomber Command.

No.609 (West Riding) Squadron began the Second World War as a fighter squadron, taking part in the Battle of Britain, before moving onto intruder operations, eventually joining Second Tactical Air Force.

30 March 2012

No.603 (City of Edinburgh) Squadron was a fighter squadron responsible for the first German aircraft to be shot down over Britain during the Second World War. It then went on to fight in the Battle of Britain and the offensive sweeps over France before moving to the Middle East where flew a mix of convoy protection, escort missions and anti-shipping strikes. Finally it returned to the UK to serve as a fighter-bomber squadron for the last months of the war in Europe.

No.604 (County of Middlesex) Squadron spent most of the Second World War as a night fighter squadron, flying a mix of defensive and offensive duties.

No.605 (County of Warwick) Squadron went through two incarnations during the Second World War, first as a fighter squadron that took part in the Battle of Britain before being destroyed during the early part of the war in the Pacific in 1942 and second as a home-based intruder squadron.

28 March 2012

No.600 'City of London' Squadron was an Auxiliary Air Force squadron that spent most of the Second World War serving as a night fighter unit, first from the UK and later in the Mediterranean.

No.601 'County of London' Squadron was a fighter squadron that took part in the fighting in France in 1940, the Battle of Britain, then moved to the Mediterranean, where it fought in North Africa, Sicily and Italy.

No.602 'City of Glasgow' Squadron was a fighter squadron that took part in the Battle of Britain before going on the offensive with 2nd Tactical Air Force. It was later withdrawn to the UK to counter the V-2 rocket.

23 March 2012

The Cruiser Tank A31 was a Rolls Royce design for a version of the Cromwell cruiser tank but with heavier armour.

The Cruiser Tank A32 was the third of a series of Rolls-Royce designs for versions of the Cromwell tank with heavier armour.

The Cruiser Tank Comet (A34) was probably the best British tank of the Second World War and was a reliable cruiser tank armed with a high velocity 77mm gun.

The Cruiser Tank A35 was the last and heaviest in a series of Rolls Royce designs for up-armoured versions of the Cromwell tank.

22 November 2011

No.341 (French) Squadron 'G.C. III/2 'Alsace' was a French-manned fighter squadron that served with 2nd Tactical Air Force, taking part in the liberation of Europe in 1944-45.

No.342 (French) Squadron G.B. I/20 'Lorraine' was a French bomber squadron that carried out daylight bombing raids from 1943-44, then day and night bombing raids to support the invasion of Europe.

No.343 Squadron was the RAF designation given to a French naval anti-submarine warfare squadron operating from Dakar.

No.344 Squadron was the RAF designation for a French-manned land based anti-submarine squadron operating from Dakar.

21 March 2012

No.582 Squadron was a Lancaster-equipped Pathfinder squadron that served with Bomber Command's main force from April 1944 until the end of the Second World War.

No.587 Squadron was an anti-aircraft co-operation unit that served in the south-west of England and southern Wales from late in 1943 until the end of the war.

No.595 Squadron was an anti-aircraft co-operation squadron that operated in Wales from its formation late in 1943 until early in 1949.

No.597 Squadron was formed as a transport squadron on 10 January 1944, but no aircraft were received, and the new squadron was disbanded on 1 March 1944.

No.598 Squadron was an anti-aircraft co-operation squadron that served in the north of Scotland from the end of 1943 until the spring of 1945.

15 March 2012

The Cruiser Tank A26 was a design for a cruiser tank that would have been based on the Infantry Tank Mk IV Churchill, but made significantly lighter

The Cruiser Tank A28 was one of a number of proposals for improved versions of the A27M Cromwell.

The Cruiser Tank A29 was a Rolls Royce design for a 45 ton cruiser tank that would have carried the excellent 17pdr gun.

The Cruiser Tank Challenger (A30) was designed in an attempt to mount the 17pdr gun in a cruiser tank. It wasn't an entirely satisfactory design, but it did enter combat in north-western Europe late in 1944 where the 17pdr gun was a welcome improvement in firepower.

12 March 2012

No.575 Squadron was an airborne forces squadron that took part in the D-Day landings, the battle of Arnhem and the crossing of the Rhine.

No.576 Squadron was a Lancaster bomber squadron that served with No.1 Group from its formation late in 1943 until the end of the Second World War.

No.577 Squadron was an anti-aircraft co-operation squadron that worked with the army and navy from its formation in December 1943 until being disbanded in June 1946.

7 March 2012

The Cruiser Tank Mk VIII Centaur (A27L) was a version of the Cromwell tank powered by a Liberty engine. It was not a great success itself, but many Centaurs were converted into or completed as Cromwells and in that configuration used in combat in north-western Europe.

The Cruiser Tank Mk VIII Cromwell (A27M) was the most important British produced tank during the campaign in north-western Europe in 1944-45 by which time it had evolved into a reliable if somewhat under-gunned tank that performed well in the 'great swan' across France.

1 March 2012

The Cruiser Tank Mk VIII Cavalier (A24) was a heavy cruiser tank based on the Crusader but with thicker armour and a 6pdr gun.

The Cruiser Tank Mk VI Crusader (A15) was the main British-built tank used in the Western Desert from 1941 until late in 1942. It earned a justified reputation for being unreliable, and was eventually replaced by the American M3s and M4s.

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