HMS Stour (1905)

HMS Stour was a River class destroyer that served with the Ninth Destroyer Flotilla in 1914-15 and the Seventh Destroyer Flotilla in 1915-1918.

The Stourand the Test were built ‘on-spec’ by Cammell Laird in 1905. The company attempted to sell them overseas, but these efforts failed. In 1908 the company offered them to the Admiralty at their original price, but by this point the River class was already seen as outdated. However two of the original River class ships, the Gala and Blackwater, had already been lost, so the Admiralty decided to buy the two Cammell Laird ships for a lower price of £50,000 each.

By 1912 Brassey’s Naval Annual listed her as being armed with four 12-pounders, after the 6-pounders were replaced across the River class as they were no longer felt to be effective

In 1911-12 the Stour was part of the 3rd Destroyer Flotilla on the Nore, which was made up of twenty-three River class destroyers and was part of the 3rd Division of the Home Fleet. This contained the older battleships and the destroyers were all partly manned.

In 1912-14 the Stour was one of twenty five River class destroyers that formed the 9th Destroyer Flotilla on the Nore, one of the new Patrol Flotillas.

Wartime Career

In July 1914 she was one of sixteen River class destroyers in the Ninth Flotilla at Chatham.

In August 1914 she was one of seven River class destroyers from the Ninth Flotilla that were on the Tyne.

HMS Stour escorting convoy, 1917
HMS Stour escorting
convoy, 1917

In November 1914 she was one of four destroyers in the 2nd Division of the Ninth Flotilla, now operating from the Tyne.

In January 1915 she was part of the Ninth Destroyer Flotilla, a patrol flotilla

In June 1915 she was one of ten River class destroyers in the Ninth Destroyer Flotilla on the Tyne.

By October 1915 she was listed as being part of the Seventh Destroyer Flotilla, mainly based on the Humber.

In January 1916 she was one of eight destroyers from the Seventh Flotilla that were based on the Tyne, north of the Flotilla’s main base on the Humber.

In October 1916 she was one of nineteen destroyers in the Seventh Flotilla, a mix of River class boats and older 30-knotters.

In January 1917 she was one of eighteen destroyers in the Seventh Flotilla.

In June 1917 she was one of twenty three destroyers in a new formation, East Coast Convoys, Humber, that was formed around the Seventh Flotilla to help run the new convoy system.

In January 1918 she was one of twenty seven destroyers in the Seventh Destroyer Flotilla, based on the Humber.

In June 1918 she was one of twenty five destroyers in the Seventh Destroyer Flotilla on the Humber, a mix of River class and 30-knotters.

In November 1918 she was one of twenty seven destroyers serving with the Seventh Destroyer Flotilla, which included ten River Class destroyers that were part of the flotilla and two borrowed from Portsmouth.

Commanders
Lt & Commander Ralph M. Mack: 7 February 1913-April 1913-
Artif Eng Richard M. Newman: - January 1914-
Lt W.A. Compton Salmond: April 1916-
Lt in command Leonard Pirie: 28 June 1918-February 1919-

Displacement (standard)

550t

Displacement (loaded)

620t

Top Speed

25.5knots

Engine

2-shaft Parsons turbines
7,000shp

Range

 

Length

220ftpp

Width

23ft 6in

Armaments

One 12-pounder gun
Five 6-pounder guns
Two 18in torpedo tubes

Crew complement

70

Laid down

 

Launched

3 June 1905

Completed

 

Sold for break up

August 1919

British Destroyers From Earliest Days to the Second World War, Norman Friedman. A very detailed look at the design of British destroyers from their earliest roots as torpedo boat destroyers, though the First World War and up to the start of the Second World War, supported by vast numbers of plans and well chosen photographs [read full review]
cover cover cover

Books on the First World War | Subject Index: First World War

How to cite this article: Rickard, J (31 March 2020), HMS Stour (1905), http://www.historyofwar.org/articles/weapons_HMS_Stour_1905.html

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