WAR IN THE AIR : Updates 2015

Updates from: 201820172016201520142013201220112010200920082007

31 December 2015

The 1st Search Attack Group was an experimental anti-submarine warfare unit that was created in the summer of 1942 at a time when the US military was struggling to cope with the threat of the U-boats.

The 343rd Fighter Group was based in Alaska from the autumn of 1942 and took part in the campaign against the Japanese in the Aleutian Islands.

The 480th Antisubmarine Group (USAAF) was based in Morocco and flew anti-submarine patrols over the Atlantic approaches to the Mediterranean.

22 December 2015

The A.E.G. B.I was an unarmed three-bay biplane with wings on unequal span. It was designed in 1914 and used a method of construction that would become the standard for A.E.G. aircraft.

The A.E.G. B.II was an improved version of the B.I. Like the B.I it used welded steel tubes for the fuselage, with wooden wing ribs and a fabric covering.

18 December 2015

The 443rd Troop Carrier Group (USAAF) supported the Allied troops fighting in Burma, and then took part in the efforts to fly supplies into China, ending the war operating directly within China.

The 477th Composite Group (USAAF) was an African-American combat unit that never reached combat, and that suffered from repeated morale problems due to segregation and suspicion of the USAAF's intentions for the group.

The 479th Antisubmarine Group operated from England from mid July 1943 to October 1943, attacking German U-boats as they crossed the Bay of Biscay.

14 December 2015

The A.E.G. J.I was an early ground attack aircraft, designed to fill the new infantry support units created by the German air service in 1916.

The A.E.G. J.II was a modified version of the A.E.G. J.I ground attack aircraft, and was introduced in 1918.

4 December 2015

The 3rd Combat Cargo Group was a transport unit that was formed in India in 1944 and that operated over India and China for the rest of the war.

The 4th Combat Cargo Group was a transport unit that fought in the Burma campaign and took part in the last stages of the air-lift of supplies into China over the 'Hump'.

The 342nd Composite Group was a mainly fighter unit that formed part of the garrison of Iceland.

27 November 2015

The Douglas C-21/ OA-3 Dolphin was an ambitious aircraft originally ordered as a bomber leader, but normally used as transport and air-sea rescue aircraft.

The Douglas C-26/ OA-4 Dolphin was an improved version of the C-21/ OA-3 Dolphin, with a number of improvements over the earlier aircraft.

19 November 2015

The Douglas YO-48 was to have been a version of the O-46A observation aircraft powered by a Wright engine, but none were built.

The Douglas O-53 Havoc was to have been a heavy observation aircraft based on the A-20 Havoc, but a large order was cancelled before any had been built.

11 November 2015

The Douglas O-43 was a parasol wing observation aircraft developed from the experimental O-31 and served with the USAAC in small numbers during the 1930s.

The Douglas O-46 was the main production version of the Douglas family of monoplane observation aircraft, and the first to use a radial engine.

30 October 2015

The Douglas O-5 was an observation aircraft based on the Douglas World Cruiser, the aircraft that made the first successful circumnavigation of the globe.

The Douglas O-31 was the first in a series of monoplane observation aircraft produced to replace the existing Douglas biplane aircraft, and eventually led to production orders for the O-43 and O-46.

22 October 2015

The Douglas XA-42/ XB-42 Mixmaster was a twin-engined pusher aircraft that was one of the most advanced piston engined aircraft of the Second World War, but that was quickly superseded by jet powered aircraft.

The Douglas XB-43 was the first US jet bomber and was produced by fitting jet engines to the earlier Douglas XB-42 Mixmaster.

20 October 2015

The 440th Troop Carrier Group took part in the D-Day landings, the invasion of the south of France, Operation Market Garden, the Battle of the Bulge and the crossing of the Rhine.

The 441st Troop Carrier Group took part in the D-Day landings, the invasion of the South of France, Operation Market Garden, the Battle of the Bulge and the crossing of the Rhine.

The 442nd Troop Carrier Group took part in the D-Day landings, the invasion of the South of France, Operation Market Garden and the crossing of the Rhine.

7 October 2015

The Douglas XB-19 (XVLR-2) was the largest US military aircraft completed before the US entry into the Second World War and provided valuable data for the development of later heavy bombers such as the Boeing B-29 Superfortress.

The Douglas XB-31 was the designation given to a series of Douglas designs produced as part of the same design contest that produced the Boeing B-29 Superfortress, none of which were ever built.

18 September 2015

The Douglas B-22 Bolo was the designation given to a version of the B-18 that would have been powered by the 1,600hp R-2600-2 Cyclone engine.

The Douglas B-23 Dragon was produced in an attempt to replace the B-18 Bolo, but its performance wasn't as good as its more modern rivals and only 38 were ever built.

16 September 2015

The 437th Troop Carrier Group (USAAF) took part in the D-Day landings, the invasion of the South of France, Operation Market Garden and the Crossing of the Rhine.

The 438th Troop Carrier Group (USAAF) took part in the D-Day landings, the invasion of the South of France, Operation Market Garden and the crossing of the Rhine.

The 439th Troop Carrier Group (USAAF) took part in the D-Day landings, the Italian campaign and the invasion of the south of France, Operation Market Garden, the Battle of the Bulge and the crossing of the Rhine.

7 September 2015

The Douglas YB-11/ YO-44/ YOA-5 began life as an amphibian navigational leader and rescue aircraft to operate alongside land based bombers, but was completed as an observation aircraft and didn't enter production.

The Douglas B-18 Bolo was a bomber based on the DC-2 airliner and played an important part in the expansion of the USAAC, despite being obsolete by the time the United States entered the Second World War.

25 August 2015

The Watanabe K6W1 Experimental 11-Shi Intermediate Seaplane Trainer was a failed design for an aircraft to replace the Yokosuka K5Y Type 93 Intermediate Seaplane Trainer.

The Watanabe E9W1 Navy Type 96 Small Reconnaissance Seaplane was the first aircraft to be designed and built by Watanabe, and was carried on the large Jun Sen Type 3 submarines.

21 August 2015

The 434th Troop Carrier Group took part in the D-Day landings, Operation Market Garden, the battle of the Bulge and the crossing of the Rhine.

The 435th Troop Carrier Group (USAAF) took part in the D-Day landings, the invasion of the south of France, Operation Market Garden and the crossing of the Rhine.

The 436th Troop Carrier Group (USAAF) took part in the D-Day landings, the invasion of the South of France, Operation Market Garden and the Crossing of the Rhine.

11 August 2015

The Yokosuka MXY7 Ohka (Cherry Blossom) 'Baka' was a manned suicide rocket that achieved limited success, but was dangerously vulnerable while being carried to its target.

The Yokosuka P1Y Ginga (Milky War) 'Frances' was a promising twin-engined medium bomber let down by reliability problems. These delayed its service entry until 1945, five years after work began on the aircraft.

31 July 2015

The Experimental Kusho 12-Shi Special Flying-boat H7Y1 was a highly secret attempt to produce a long range flying boat that could reach Hawaii from Japan and return safely with its photographs.

The Yokosuka E14Y Navy Type 0 Submarine-borne Reconnaissance Seaplane 'Glen' was a tiny reconnaissance aircraft that was also the only hostile aircraft to drop bombs on the American mainland during the Second World War.

30 July 2015

The 403rd Troop Carrier Group (USAAF) provided cargo and passenger transport services in the south-west Pacific, as well as supporting the campaigns on New Guinea and the Philippines.

The 419th Troop Carrier Group (USAAF) ran transport terminals that helped to organise the activities of other transport units.

The 433rd Troop Carrier Group (USSAF) operated in support of the campaigns on New Guinea and the Philippines and moved parts of the Fifth Air Force to Okinawa.

22 July 2015

The Yokosuka R1Y Seiun (Blue Cloud) was a design for a long-range reconnaissance aircraft that was abandoned due to poor performance figures.

The Yokosuka R2Y Keiun (Beautiful Cloud or Lucky Cloud) was a long-range land-based reconnaissance aircraft powered by two engines mounted within the fuselage and driving a single propeller.

7 July 2015

The Yokosuka K4Y1 Type 90 Seaplane Trainer was produced to replace the Yokosho K1Y Type 13 Seaplane Trainer, and was the first Japanese production aircraft to use a welded steel tube fuselage.

The Yokosuka K5Y 'Willow' Type 93 Intermediate Trainer was the most widely produced training aircraft produced in Japan, and remained in production from 1933 to 1945.

2 July 2015

The 349th Troop Carrier Group reached the European theatre too late to take part in any of the major set-piece airborne assault of the Second World War.

The 374th Troop Carrier Group took part in the long campaign in New Guinea, performing an especially valuable role early in the campaign, when Allied resources were very limited.

The 375th Troop Carrier Group (USAAF) took part in the long campaign in New Guinea, then supported the liberation of the Philippines and the campaign on Okinawa.

24 June 2015

The Yokosho K1Y Navy Type 13 Trainer was produced to replace the existing I-go Ko-gata and Avro 504 seaplane trainers, and was in use from the mid 1920s until the early part of the Pacific War, although in decreased numbers from 1930.

The Yokosho K2Y Navy Type 3 Land-based Primary Trainer was the Japanese Navy's main primary trainer during the 1930s and remained in service at the start of the Pacific War.

11 June 2015

The Yokosho E1Y Type 14 Reconnaissance Seaplane was based on the earlier Yokosho Type 10 Reconnaissance Seaplane, and was a single-engined biplane that remained in service into the early 1930s.

The Yokosho E5Y Navy Type 90-3 Reconnaissance Seaplane was one of three designs accepted by the Japanese Navy to replace the earlier Yokosho Type 14 E1Y, but was only produced in tiny numbers.

2 June 2015

The Yokosuka D3Y Myojo (Venus) was originally intended to be a wooden version of the Aichi D3A2-K bomber trainer, but the design was modified while the aircraft was under development. A suicide attack version was also developed, but the prototype of this version was unfinished at the end of the Second World War.

The Yokosuka D4Y Suisei (Comet) 'Judy' was designed as a dive bomber, but entered service as a reconnaissance aircraft. It eventually served in that role, and as a bomber and suicide attack aircraft.

22 May 2015

The Yokosuka B3Y Navy Type 92 Carrier Attack Aircraft was a disappointing level bomber that was produced to replace the Mitsubishi B2M Type 89 Carrier Attack Aircraft

The Yokosuka B4Y Type 96 Carrier Attack Bomber 'Jean' was a torpedo bomber that the Allies erroneously believed was still in service in 1941, a mistake that played a part in their underestimating the threat from Japanese air power.

19 May 2015

The 315th Troop Carrier Group took part in the D-Day landings, Operation Market Garden and the airborne crossing of the Rhine.

The 316th Troop Carrier Group took part in the fighting in North Africa, the invasions of Sicily and Italy, the D-Day landings, Operation Market Garden and the airborne crossing of the Rhine.

The 317th Troop Carrier Group served in the Pacific theatre, taking part in the long New Guinea campaign and in the re conquest of the Philippines.

13 May 2015

The Navy Yokosho I-go Ko-gata Seaplane Trainer was produced to replace a pusher Farman type trainer, and was used alongside the Avro 504 by the Japanese Navy in the early 1920s. 

The Yokosuka Type 91 Intermediate Trainer was judged to be too close in performance to contemporary service aircraft, and was thus rejected for production.

8 May 2015

The 89th Troop Carrier Group (USAAF) was a home-based training unit that operated from 1942 to 1944.

The 313th Troop Carrier Group (USAAF) was a transport unit that took part in the invasion of Sicily, the Salerno landings, the D-Day landings, Operation Market Garden and the crossing of the Rhine.

The 314th Troop Carrier Group took part in the invasions of Sicily and Italy, the D-Day landings, Operation Market Garden and the crossing of the Rhine.

4 May 2015

The Navy Yokosho Ro-go Ko-gata Reconnaissance Seaplane was the first Japanese-designed aircraft to enter production for the Japanese Navy, and was in service into the late 1920s.

The Navy Yokosho Type 10 Reconnaissance Seaplane was an unsatisfactory design for an aircraft to replace the Ro-go Ko-gata seaplane that eventually evolved into the more successful Yokosho Type 14 Reconnaissance Seaplane E1Y.

23 April 2015

The Yokosho 1-go Reconnaissance Seaplane was designed to be operated from a submarine, and was successfully tested but didn't enter production.

The Yokosho E6Y Type 19 Reconnaissance Seaplane was the first submarine-based reconnaissance plane to be officially accepted by the Japanese Navy.

22 April 2015

The 62nd Troop Carrier Group (USAAF) took part in the battle for Tunisia, the invasion of Sicily, the fighting on the mainland of Italy, the invasion of the south of France and supported partisans in the Balkans.

The 63rd Troop Carrier Group (USAAF) was a home based transport unit that was used to move supplies in North America and later as a training group.

The 64th Troop Carrier Group (USAAF) was a transport unit that operated in North Africa, Sicily, Italy, the south of France and briefly in Burma during the siege of Imphal.

14 April 2015

The 10th Troop Carrier Group (USAAF) was a transport unit that was based in the United States throughout its existence.

The 60th Troop Carrier Group (USAAF) served in the Mediterranean Theatre and took part in Operation Torch, the battle for Tunisia, the invasion of Sicily the liberation of Greece and the partisan battles in Yugoslavia.

The 61st Troop Carrier Group (USAAF) began operations in the Mediterranean, where it took part in the invasions of Sicily and Italy, before moving to England to take part in the D-Day invasion, Operation Market-Garden and the crossing of the Rhine.

26 March 2015

The Kawanishi K-11 Experimental Carrier Fighter was a private venture aircraft produced in an attempt to win a contest being held to replace the Mitsubishi Type 10 Carrier Fighter (1MF1 to 1MF5).

The Kawanishi Baika (Plum Blossom) was a design for a piloted suicide aircraft based loosely on the V1 flying bomb.

The Kawanishi Ki-85 was a very rare example of a Kawanishi aircraft designed for the Japanese Army. It would have been a four-engined heavy bomber based on the Douglas DC-4E and Nakajima G5N1 Shinzan (Mountain Recess), but the project was cancelled early.

25 March 2015

The 423rd Reconnaissance Group (USAAF) was a short lived home-based training unit that was disbanded within five months of being activated.

The 424th Reconnaissance Group (USAAF) was a home-based unit that was never fully organised, despite being officially activated on 1 April 1943.

The 426th Reconnaissance Group (USAAF) was a home-based unit that was never fully organised, despite being officially activated on 1 July 1943.

The 432nd Reconnaissance Group (USAAF) was a home-based unit that served with the AAF School of Applied Tactics.

16 March 2015

The Kawanishi K6K1 Experimental 11-Shi Intermediate Seaplane Trainer was an unsuccessful attempt to produce a new trainer to replace the Yokosuka K5Y ‘Willow’ Type 93 Intermediate Seaplane Trainer and Kawanishi E7K 'Alf' Type 94 Reconnaissance Seaplane

The Kawanishi K8K1 Navy Type 0 Primary Seaplane Trainer was produced in small numbers in 1940, but was cancelled after the Japanese Navy abandoned the use of primary seaplane trainers.

4 March 2015

The Kawanishi E11K1 Experimental 11-Shi Special Reconnaissance Seaplane / Navy Type 96 Transport was Kawanishi's second attempt to produce a spotter flying boat for the Japanese Navy, and like the first attempt ended in failure.

The Kawanishi E13K1 Experimental 12-Shi Three-seat Reconnaissance Seaplane was an unsuccessful attempt to design an aircraft to replace the Navy Type 94 Reconnaissance Seaplane E7K.

3 March 2015

The 74th Reconnaissance Group (USAAF) was a home based training group that both trained air crews and operated in support of army units that were training in the United States.

The 75th Reconnaissance Group (USAAF) was a home based unit that supported army training unit in 1942 and was a replacement training unit from 1943 until 1944.

The 76th Reconnaissance Group (USAAF) was a home based unit that operated alongside army units that were training in the United States.

The 77th Reconnaissance Group (USAAF) was a home based unit that mainly operated alongside army units undergoing training, but that also provided detachments for active service around the borders of the United States and in India.

20 February 2015

The Nieuport 82 was a basic trainer based on the Nieuport 14 observation aircraft.

The Nieuport 83 was an advanced trainer based on the Nieuport 10 two-seat observation aircraft.

12 February 2015

The Nieuport 80 was a two-seat trainer with one set of controls, developed from the Nieuport 12 and Nieuport 13.

The Nieuport 81 was a dual control trainer based on the earlier Nieuport 12 and Nieuport 13.

5 February 2015

The Kawanishi E8K1 Experimental 8-Shi Reconnaissance Seaplane was an advanced monoplane design that didn't have the manoeuvrability required by the Japanese navy and thus never entered production.

The Kawanishi E10K1 Experimental 9-Shi Night Reconnaissance Seaplane was designed to serve as a spotter aircraft with the Japanese fleet, but failed to satisfy in that role, or in its alternative role as a light transport.

3 February 2015

The 70th Reconnaissance Group (USAAF) was a home based unit that was used to help with the training of army units.

The 71st Reconnaissance Group (USAAF) operated in the Pacific theatre from the end of 1943 until the end of the Second World War, focusing on reconnaissance but flying a wide range of other missions at the same time.

The 72nd Reconnaissance Group (USAAF) was a reconnaissance group that was based in the Panama Canal Zone during 1942 and 1943.

27 January 2015

The Nieuport 27 was the last in the long series of Nieuport sesquiplane fighters that had begun with the Nieuport 10 and Nieuport 11, and was very similar to the previous version, the Nieuport Type 24.

The Nieuport 28 was a totally new design that was produced in an attempt to replace the famous sesquiplane fighters that had begin with the Nieuport 10 and Nieuport 11.

19 January 2015

The Nieuport 19 was a twin-engined aircraft that was ordered by the RNAS, but that was never delivered.

The Nieuport Triplane of 1916-17 was a very unusual design, with the middle wing thrust well forward of the upper wing. This arrangement was meant to improve the pilot's view, but the aircraft was unstable and didn't enter production.

14 January 2015

The 67th Reconnaissance Group flew with the Eighth and Ninth Air Forces during the campaign in Europe in 1944-45, taking part in the D-Day campaign, the advance through France, the battle of the Bulge and the final invasion of Germany.

The 68th Reconnaissance Group (USAAF) was originally formed as an Observation Group in the United States in the summer of 1941, before serving in the Mediterranean Theatre as a reconnaissance, ground attack and electronic countermeasures group.

The 69th Reconnaissance Group (USAAF) spent most of the Second World War operating as a training unit, but did reach Europe in time to take part in the last few weeks of the war against Germany.

8 January 2015

The Nieuport 15 was an attempt to produce a dedicated bomber, but its performance was disappointing and despite an order from the RNAS it never entered service.

The designation Nieuport 18 appears to have been given to more than one aircraft type, including a single engined fighter and a twin engined three-man bomber.

5 January 2015

The 26th Reconnaissance Group was a home-based unit that took part in military exercises and helped train ground forces.

The 65th Reconnaissance Group went through two incarnations during the Second World War, the first as a home based observation unit and the second as a training unit.

The 66th Reconnaissance Group was a home-based unit that served as a reconnaissance and and artillery spotting training unit as well as flying anti-submarine patrols during the first half of 1942.

Updates from: 201820172016201520142013201220112010200920082007



Help - F.A.Q. - Contact Us - Search - Recent - About Us -  Subscribe in a reader - Join our Google Group - Cookies